Unit 3

Unit 3: Assignment 1

In the debates leading up to the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, then Secretary of State Dean Rusk made the following statement regarding the potential number of Indians who might want to immigrate from India: "The present estimate, based upon the best information we can get, is that there might be, say, 8,000 immigrants from India in the next five years. In other words, I don't think we have a particular picture of a world situation where everybody is just straining to move to the Unites States." Conduct online research to determine how many Indians actually immigrated to the U.S. in every decade since 1965. Why were Rusk and others so wrong in their estimates?...

Unit 3: Assignment 2

Upon signing the Immigration Bill, Lyndon Johnson said: “This bill that we will sign today is not a revolutionary bill. It does not affect the lives of millions. It will not reshape the structure of our daily lives, or really add importantly to either our wealth or our power. Yet it is still one of the most important acts of this Congress and of this administration. For it does repair a very deep and painful flaw in the fabric of American justice. It corrects a cruel and enduring wrong in the conduct of the American Nation”. In a recent research report called “Immigrant Entrepreneurs” (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2159875), the findings demonstrated that of the engineering and technology companies founded in the U.S. between 2006 and 2012, 24.3% had at least one foreign-born founder. Immigrant founders of engineering and technology companies employed roughly 560,000 workers and generated an estimated $63 billion in sales during that time. Of all immigrant-founded companies, 33.2% had Indian founders. The top 10 sending countries of immigrant entrepreneurs, in descending order, were India (33.2%), China (8.1%), the United Kingdom (6.3%), Canada (4.2%), Germany (3.9%), Israel (3.5%), Russia (2.4%), Korea (2.2%), Australia (2%) and the Netherlands (2%). What conclusions do you draw from these statistics? Write a 500-word essay on this discussion board describing whether you agree or disagree with Lyndon Johnson’s remarks in 1965 that “the bill that we will sign today is not a revolutionary bill”, and why. You may conduct your own additional research to help you in your response....

Unit 3: Assignment 3

In the article that you have already read in Unit 1 of this magazine – “The Hindu Invasion: A new immigration problem” written in 1907, the author Fred Lockley poses this question to the reader when told by an immigration officer that Indians ought to go to the warmer states in the US - Southern California, Arizona or New Mexico - to find a climate more suitable to them. “California would suit them to a T” he suggested. Lockley in turn makes the following comment: “That, of course, may all be very true. California might suit them to a T. But would they suit California to a T is a question also to be considered.” From the reading “Indians of Silicon Valley”, describe on this discussion forum, some of the influences that Indians and Hindus have had on California. Conclude with your response to Lockley’s question “would they (Indians) suit California to a T?...

Unit 3: Assignment 4

Oral histories are a tool for learning about people, their experiences, and the events that affect their lives. Through interviewing people and then retelling their stories, we are able to understand the events of the past. Most Indians in the U.S. today are here as a result of the 1965 Immigration Act. Chances are that either your parents or grandparents were immigrants to the country. For this oral history assignment, choose one member of your family or circle of friends who made the initial journey to America. Request an interview with this person consisting of at least 10 questions (see below). Record your interview in either a journal or on video; then summarize your findings on this blog and compare these findings with what you know about earlier immigrants, based on what you have read in this magazine so far. Some examples of questions to ask: a. What circumstances prompted you to immigrate to the U.S.? Did you come alone or with your family? Did you have either close or extended family already living in the U.S.? b. How did you fund the trip to the U.S.? c. What were your impressions of the U.S. prior to moving here? d. What were your first impressions of the U.S. upon landing? Where did you first arrive? e. What initial challenges did you experience as an immigrant? f. What cultural or social values did you have that either aided or inhibited your assimilation into the United States? g. What, if any, surprises did you experience during your first six months in the U.S. h. What career/profession/business have you pursued? What made you choose this particular line of work? i. How many years have you lived in the U.S. and what are your circumstances today? j. Are you happy you decided to immigrate to the U.S.? Do you have any regrets about having moved...